Local colleges

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abpk2903
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Re: Local colleges

Postby abpk2903 » June 5th, 2018, 2:48 pm

Perfect example.  College is basically giving up 4 years (or more) of your life's earning potential to invest in yourself to hopefully make more in the long run.  This is where I disagree with TheAnalyst's philosophy a bit.  If you are going to "do" college, then do it right.  Don't take courses that may be subpar at a local community college taught by instructors that probably are barely qualified unless that is your only means at that point.  Spend the extra few grand and get the very most out of your education.  That WSJ article has great examples of what the average student will earn after attending a top 100 university versus universities that don't score as highly.  



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konjo78
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Re: Local colleges

Postby konjo78 » June 5th, 2018, 2:53 pm

Also GET A JOB while at college. As an employer my #1 field for hiring someone is not college but work experience.

Have a buddy who graduated with a masters in december in agriculture and no one will hire him because he lacks work experience.

Personally ill take someone I know has done a job before than college graduate anyday

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Re: Local colleges

Postby TheAnalyst » June 5th, 2018, 3:36 pm

This is all so very situational to each person. In Manfred’s example, they have $256k wrapped up in an education. Even at 83k a year, it will most likely take 10 years to pay that back. The kid has to move to Europe. Europe is not cheap. Unless the company is paying for absolutely everything while he is there. And the kid is willing to travel. I guess that is one of my main points. If the person is not willing to go where the job is to maximize income potential, they have to be mindful of the area they will be residing. If Manfred’s nephew wanted to work and stay in the Johnstown area, no matter what, those numbers don’t make sense. His parents could have bought him a really nice house and he’d be set for life.

Likewise with going to a community college and such. Does it really matter if they take English 101 there or at Harvard? Not really. Use it for what it’s for, like general classes. Not everyone wants to go to college, and not everyone who wants to go to college wants to be the next superstar in their field of study. It’s really a difference between working in a rural and urban setting, the opportunities available, and the willingness to travel to take advantage of those. It really is an individual choice. But I think we all pretty much agree with what we are saying. It’s quite a bit to take in and decide when you are only a teenager.

konjo78
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Re: Local colleges

Postby konjo78 » June 5th, 2018, 4:00 pm

TheAnalyst wrote:This is all so very situational to each person.  In Manfred’s example, they have $256k wrapped up in an education.  Even at 83k a year, it will most likely take 10 years to pay that back.  The kid has to move to Europe.  Europe is not cheap.  Unless the company is paying for absolutely everything while he is there.  And the kid is willing to travel.  I guess that is one of my main points.  If the person is not willing to go where the job is to maximize income potential, they have to be mindful of the area they will be residing.  If Manfred’s nephew wanted to work and stay in the Johnstown area, no matter what, those numbers don’t make sense.  His parents could have bought him a really nice house and he’d be set for life.

Likewise with going to a community college and such.  Does it really matter if they take English 101 there or at Harvard?  Not really.  Use it for what it’s for, like general classes.  Not everyone wants to go to college, and not everyone who wants to go to college wants to be the next superstar in their field of study.  It’s really a difference between working in a rural and urban setting, the opportunities available, and the willingness to travel to take advantage of those.  It really is an individual choice.  But I think we all pretty much agree with what we are saying.  It’s quite a bit to take in and decide when you are only a teenager.

Not to mention colleges dont really try their best to get students ready for the real world situations out there... They would rather you decide base on what you like then come back later when you find out that degree they offer is basically a participation trophy

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Re: Local colleges

Postby abpk2903 » June 5th, 2018, 4:27 pm

The problem is, I am 28 and have a dozen plus years of life and work experience to help shape my decision.  Luckily looking back, I think the path I went was a good one.  I would definitely have done a few things differently (like not turn down a position with the National Labor Relations Board because it would have meant taking a semester off) but overall I think I did ok.  Unfortunately, a lot of 16, 17, 18 year olds don't make a great decision.  They get buried in debt without a path or direction to get out of it.  Or they get half way through and decide they "can't afford it anymore" then drop out.  I really think these universities need to force prospective students to take some training to help these kids understand the importance of the education they are earning.  Studying psych may be easy and fun but where does it lead.  It could lead to a great opportunity if you have an end goal in mind or it may mean your only serious career path is becoming a college professor. It's funny how a $100k education is viewed (which is the cost of tuition, books, room, and board for a bachelors degree at Pitt or PSU).  It can jumpstart a long successful career at about a third of the cost of a home outside of the central PA area.  Or it can be a $1,400/mth and 30 year burden if you don't play your cards correctly. 

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Re: Local colleges

Postby Manfred » June 5th, 2018, 5:24 pm

To be fair, I should have given a little more info. Nephew grew up in Fla. Has a fiancee from Conn. who graduated from Brown, so they are living in Mass. near both their jobs. She is in teaching. His internship in Switzerland was paid for by his new employer. He'll be making over 100K in 5 years. Now- as the son of a 2nd year Hispanic resident of Fla., he could have gotten a free ride to ANY of the Fla. Universities, but their curriculi did not have either what he wanted, or was not a very good program. He knew what he wanted, and chose from among the top 5 or 6 schools in his chosen field, and got it done, and done well. He'll do OK.
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Re: Local colleges

Postby knowitall » June 6th, 2018, 8:30 am

Another interesting fact when looking at college numbers is that as much as 56% of today's college students are women. How many of them are going to become stay at home moms?

What are the men doing? At the recent HS National Honor Society ceremony I attended 31 participants were girls. Just nine were boys.


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